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Category Archives: Low Maintenance

Favorite Flowering Shrubs for Greensboro

I have several favorites and Limelight Hydrangea and Wine and Roses Weigela are two of them. In order to make the list of favorites I look at overall form, length of bloom, pest problems,water requirements and general maintenance.

For larger properties, Limelight Hydrangea is a must have in the landscape.

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Limelight Hydrangeas grow to 8 feet around in part sun and prefer some shade from afternoon sun. Chartreuse cone-shaped blooms fill the plant in mid-summer and remain on the shrub until autumn when the color changes to a pinkish rose. If planted in good composted soil, once established, requires minimal water during dry periods. It makes a great specimen plant or hedge. This shrub is mostly pest free,  but if insects are noticed, just spray them with a powerful dose of water.

Wine and Roses Weigela is a smaller shrub growing 4-5 feet around with great impact. It blooms from April to June with deep fuchsia pink flowers that hummingbirds love. When planted in full sun the foliage retains its deep purple coloration and is a pest free plant. The stunning foliage combines well when planted adjacent to light green colored plants like Emerald n Gold Euonymous or Golden Barberry.

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This shrub has a round upright growing habit and works well towards the rear of a perennial bed or in a mixed shrub border.

wr3 For more favorite landscape plants, check here

cornerstone-garden1 Visit Cornerstone Garden by Diana Digs Dirt 414-B State St from Thursday through Saturday 11-3:30. Diana is a certified landscape designer providing landscape plans, installations and consultations.

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Do You Mow for Hours?

Are You Mowing 3 or More Hours Every Week?

Properties in the Triad’s Southeast region are rather expansive and may tie up several hours per week to mow. With yearly drought threats, hot sun, and heavy clay soil, homeowners may feel captive by their lawn areas each weekend. These large green or brown areas have potential to burst with color, help with erosion and attract butterflies and hummingbirds, while freeing up valuable weekends for rest and relaxation. Now is the perfect time to start your drought tolerate garden.

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Some deciduous perennials for the hassle-free gardens are; ratibida, vervain, black eyed susan, gaura, daylily, aster, wine cups, blanket flower, ice plant, bee balm, russian sage, artemesia, baptisia, agastache, hyssop, catnip, red hot poker, grasses, penstemon, mint, coneflower, jewel of opar, daisy, yarrow, coreopsis, caryopteris, joe-pye weed, butterfly weed, plumbago, spotted dead nettle, and globe thistle.

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These are perfect evergreen perennials including; prostrate sedums, lavender, rosemary, creeping or upright thyme, santolina, creeping phlox, creeping raspberry and wintercreeper

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With this palate of drought tolerant plants, make sure to incorporate some evergreen perennials for winter interest and place taller plants towards the middle or back of the new beds. Before the planting begins, take time to till the soil or dig the hole twice the size of the plant’s container to ensure a good root system and topdress with mulch. Next year you can divide your plants and increase the maintenance free and drought tolerate gardens.

Come visit Diana Digs Dirt-Landscape Designer at Cornerstone Garden 414-B State Street from Thursday-Saturday 11-3:30 if not raining or snowing and lets talk low maintenance. Or reach me at 392.4031

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Posted by on February 23, 2013 in Greensboro Gardens, Low Maintenance

 

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