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Tag Archives: Landscaping

Greensboro Curb Appeal Ideas

4 Fundamental Factors for Fantastic First Impression Curb Appeal

mailbox

  1. Mailbox Area
  2. The House Exterior
  3. The Front Door
  4. The Landscape

 Mailbox Area– This is how we are finding the address.

  • clear and visible numbers
  • use same material/paint on house and mailbox-creates cohesion
  • remove bee attracting flowers
  • remove shrubs higher than 3 feet-hinders car views
  • add colorful annuals-use 1 variety of the same color

House Exterior– should be pressure washed, shutters hung straight, cracks in mortar are fixed. Debris like leaves or small trees removed from gutters. If there are trees overhanging the house, suggest removing.

  • leaves in gutters
  • creates mildew on roof-holds in moisture
  • easy access for ants and other unwanted creatures
  • ice on branches-damage home

The Front Door– view from a visitor’s perspective

  • fresh coat of paint
  • shrubs cut back-no higher than 2-3 feet
  • add color-pots, annuals, wreath (use same annuals as front door plantings)
  • make sure it is visible from the street (inviting and safe) 

The Landscape– does the overall look of the front landscape appeal to buyers?

  • grass areas- turn slopes and patchy grass areas into plant beds
  • foundation plants- 75% should be evergreen plants
  • driveway and walkway to front door- cut back any overhanging trees and shrubs and remove those with thorns
  • condition of trees and shrubs- remove any dead or dying plant material. Do not shear broad-leafed evergreens
  • plant beds- create a manicured edge with a spade. 1 bale of pine needles will cover 5 x 5 square foot area

Problem Issues

  • remove runway lighting-purchase a lighting kit for under $100 including a few path lights and uplights
  • erosion problems- hide the soil with mulch if downspouts are eroding soil
  • remove personal garden art-pink flamingoes, gazing balls, flag poles, fences without purpose, etc.

Landscape Designer Diana Digs Dirt is open Thursday-Saturday from 11-3:30 414-b State Street in Greensboro

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Sentiment Gardens Workshop-Cornerstone Garden

Treasured Memorabilia turns Memories into Gardens

Free Workshop Cornerstone Garden (414-B State Street)
September 3rd and September 10th at 10am
Beginning next door at The Secret Tea Room (412 State Street)
RSVP 392.4031

Strolling through the eclectic grounds of Cornerstone Garden in Greensboro,NC, several patrons openly expressed to store owner Diana Gardner-Williams that many keepsakes of loved ones past were difficult to part with.CornerstoneGardenis designed by using non-conventional items or pieces not necessarily found in the landscape, creating unique outdoor scenes or vignettes.

Stressful events such as loosing a loved one can lead to collecting because one often associates certain objects with the lost loved one.  Not letting go of “things” which may be viewed by others as unimportant, trivial, or even trash, is a physical way to “keep” the loved one who is no longer present. Popular television shows such as; Hoarding: Buried Alive and Hoarders have revealed the secret lives of those having difficulty in letting go of tangible objects after such events.

 All are welcome to a free workshop in Greensboro, N.C.at Cornerstone Garden to discuss the art of incorporating keepsakes into homes and gardens with a designer’s eye. Workshop will begin at The Secret Tea Room (412 State Street) at 10 am Saturday September 3rd and Saturday September 10th, 2011. Please call Diana for reservations at 336.392.4031. Individual questions can be answered after the tour.

Diana Gardner-Williams, store owner of Cornerstone Garden, is a professional landscape designer working under the name Diana Digs Dirt for the past 13 years. She began helping the community create memory gardens after the stillbirth of her son in 2003. “My family keepsakes are designed into my daily environment providing great comfort because of the emotional connections,” says Mrs. Gardner-Williams.

If interested, there will be a plant swap September 3rd 8:30am at Cornerstone Garden

 

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Greensboro’s Cornerstone Garden Accepting Treasures

Cornerstone Garden (formerly, My Secret Garden) is now accepting your treasures, or should we say, junk, trash, dumpster digs, or garbage. Donate items to be up-cycled, adding to the charm and overall look of the new garden boutique. Your treasure could be used in a new and exciting way throughout the grounds.

Take a peek at some of the up-cycled treasures at 414-B State Street in Greensboro, NC. Trash to Treasure

 A metal towel rack used for a plant display

   Metal buckets, 2 tier fountain

  Closet doors attached to arbor

 Hanging planters created from tractor stands

    Window frames add charm to outdoor vignettes

    Shutters can be used in various ways

   Bushel baskets make great plant displays and add vertical interest in the garden.

 Handmade chicken wire hanging basket filled with ivy, sedum and carex grass.

Wheel barrow fountain

 A salvaged child’s swing offers your favorite plants at eye level

       At Cornerstone Garden, chairs are offered to the plants first

 Some gadget from a tractor

 Items in search of

  • Metal shelves, containers, utensils, (love anything metal)
  • Pressure Treated Wood from decks, fences or other
  • Wood or plastic containers
  • Dresser drawers
  • Window Frames, Doors, Shutters
  • PVC Pipe
  • Plastic Sand Boxes or Pools
  • Tin Roofing
  • Broken or Whole Bricks/Stone
  • Terra Cotta Pots
  • Fabric-Pink, White, Black, Red, Gold or Silver
  • Chicken Wire
  • Bushel Baskets
  • Mailboxes
 Cornerstone Garden is also accepting artwork, ironwork, birdhouses, etc on consignment (North Carolina artisans only please). Contact Diana Digs Dirt for more information at 392.4031.
 
Boutique is open Tues-Friday 10-5 and Saturday 9-4
 
 
Thank you Songbirds Consignment for their generous donation of many up-cycled items
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Diana Digs My Secret Garden-3

 

414 State Street, formally known as, “My Secret Garden”.

A beautiful weekend to work on State Street. Much was accomplished like tilling the front terrace and removing unwanted plants.

4×4 caps were placed on the posts for iron fence, where pots will be installed later.

Every inch of this location will be taken advantage of. Cracks in the sidewalk, stairs and wall will be planted with crevice plants (not weeds).

 Several cascading plants will adorn the brick wall and bloom at various times of the year. Bulbs, annuals and perennials will add to the splendor. There will be a few spots open for people to sit as well.

Needed a nice entryway planter filled with perennials, sedum, annuals and the grass on top is called Amazon Mist.

   2 “Burgundy Cotton” Crape Myrtles were installed by the fence.

The project was supervised by my son.

We are getting there and hope to have our Grand Opening April 30th (after our April 16th event), just in time for Mothers Day plants, gifts baskets and more!

 Happy Planting!

Landscape Design, Installations, Consultations and Speaking Engagements

 

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Piedmont Triad Landscapes-Preventing Weeds

February is the time to apply an application of pre-emergent herbicide (like Preen). This product kills any annual weed seeds from germinating, like chickweed. It works for about 3 months, so another application in May and another in July/August, because different weeds grow at different periods.

First, determine your enemy and then find the solution. If you have perennial weeds such as horserope or poison ivy, this product will not work. Hand pulling or the use of an herbicide like Round-Up need to come into play.

Annual weeds are plentiful in the Piedmont Triad Area. With a nice 3-4 inches of mulch, weed seeds will have a difficult time reaching the sunlight for photosynthesis. Another option is planting non-invasive groundcovers like, mazus, iberis, or creeping phlox, to name a few.

Purslane  in an annual weed growing close to the ground in the summer.

Below is another weed called spurge, with a more radiating growth habit, both are summer annual weeds.

Sorry to say, dandelions are perennial weeds and need to be hand-picked.

There is another solution! Hire someone to do it for you, 360 Landscape and Lawn Maintenance.

If you have a natural area in an open exposed location, weed seeds will want to put down their roots. Make sure it is mulched and incorporate some groundcovers. Don’t forget the pre-emergent herbicides for February, May, July/August (we know you are on vacation) to ensure weed-free beds.

Remember-What is weed is to some, may not be to another (consult the women of the home before eradicating please).

Happy Pulling and we’ll see you at the “Celebrating Mother Earth” Event in April

Diana Digs Dirt

Landscaping Design, Installation, Consultations and Speaking Engagements

 
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Posted by on February 4, 2011 in Landscape Maintenance, Weed Prevention

 

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Piedmont Triad Commercial Landscaping Projects

Landscaping companies are still installing landscape plans in this down economy. Are commercial and institutional properties taking the time to look at maintenance, mature size of plant material, or what this plant needs to survive? Study the landscape plan now before the $$$ leave your pocketbook. Check out Better Homes and Gardens on this issue.

Many, many projects are re-design. Why, plants have overgrown their spaces because the landscaping company did not know how this particular plant grew or what cultural requirements were needed to thrive (sun, shade, protection from wind, water, water and more water).

It is our job as landscape designers being able to identify plant material in the winter months. This is necessary when there are existing plants on the property and designing with keeping their integrity in tact.

We look at the shape of the buds, size, color, if they are alternate or opposite, like the one above. Also analyze plant form, bark (texture, color, lenticels or exfoliation), branching habit and seed pods, fruit or cones of the plant like the Fig Tree below

The nandina shrubs (planted very close to the sidewalk), will grow to 6 feet tall and spread to 4 feet, with the added nightmare of suckering where plants are not needed. A better selection would have been dwarf nandina, where no shearing or pruning is needed.

Designing the landscapes for commercial and institutional properties are looking at budget. It might look like a good idea to save the money up front, but in the long run, you will pay more. The property below has increased maintenance due to the column and post.

 It will take more time to trim the grass than it would be to turn it into a bed and install no maintenance evergreen groundcover. Remember, 75% of your public landscape should be evergreen. A better selection for this area could have been creeping sedum.

Landscaping companies don’t always consider the aesthetics of the landscape plan.  Below rip rap was used on a slope. This is used to stabilize the slope from erosion. We hope that they come back to install evergreen groundcovers, covering this utility rock.

Wendover Avenue is a highly visible with a large amount of traffic, not to be landscaped properly.

If you think hiring a landscape designer before calling a local landscape company will break the bank, look at all the future maintenance adding to he overall monthly costs. Do it right the first time.

Happy Planting!
DianaDigsDirt
Landscape Design and Installation
 

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English Ivy Can Cause Problems-REMOVE

Here in Greensboro, NC, English Ivy is prevalent in all established neighborhoods like Fisher Park and Irving Park, and is taking over. Let’s look at the damage this beautiful evergreen groundcover can cause and where it can be used safely.

Groundcovers are a great way to cut down on the surface area of your property to be mowed. Established neighborhoods have an abundant amount of English Ivy because that was the trend, like boxwoods. Is your English Ivy planted at the foundation of your home or at the front entryway? If so, this should be removed. This groundcover will climb your home and destroy the mortar or paint. It is a RAPID grower, especially if planted in part shade or shade. We have problems with Copperhead snakes in Greensboro and English Ivy planted by the front entryway serves as a nice cool hangout and potential danger.

English Ivy should never be planted in a natural area where trees are also planted unless a regular landscape maintenance program includes removing from tree trunks. Mentioned above, English Ivy grows very fast and will eventually grow into the canopy of trees and smoother foliage in need of sunlight for photosynthesis.

English Ivy makes a great addition to outdoor pots. It provides evergreen interest with foliage cascading over the edges.

English Ivy is perfect for shady slopes where mowing on an incline is almost impossible. The slope below is perfect for the groundcover.

English Ivy is perfect for large natural beds in shady locations without trees or shrubs within. With Piedmont Triad properties having large outdoor spaces, natural beds reduce maintenance.

English Ivy is wonderful for front landscaping because of its manicured and evergreen growing habit. Remember, 75% of your front landscaping should be evergreen to provide year round curb appeal.

Love the fact that English Ivy is a great addition to centerpieces too.

Happy Planting and Removing! Here is a company I recommend for the English Ivy Removal, 360 Landscape and Lawn Maintenance

DianaDigsDirt

 
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Posted by on January 3, 2011 in English Ivy

 

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